I attended CHI 2014 in Toronto and had a great time. Here, in no particular order, are some of the things I saw in the posters section. Posters are smaller research results, or works in progress, presented with a poster and a short paper.

Suit Up! Eyes-Free Interactions on Jacket Buttons

Suit Up! buttonsSome design thinking and basic prototyping of how you might interact with wearable technology using buttons on your clothing. Prototype suit jacket buttons above are: 1. Four-way control; 2. Status LEDs; 3. OLED Display; 4. Piezo-electric Speaker.

Kashyap Todi and Kris Luyten. Suit up!: enabling eyes-free interactions on jacket buttons. In CHI ’14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

Project page

ExtendedThumb

extendedthumbAn offset cursor technique to help users select items using their thumb on large screens (e.g. Samsung Galaxy Note), by using a virtual thumb. “After initiating it with double tap: 1) aim at a target, 2) move the virtual thumb towards the target, 3) adjust the virtual thumb position and place the red cross located at the tip of the virtual thumb on the target, and 4) lift the real thumb up from the screen to select the target.”

Jianwei Lai and Dongsong Zhang. ExtendedThumb. In CHI ’14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

 Extending Interaction for Smart Watches

expanding_interaction_for_smart_watchesSome exploration around expanding the interaction space for smart watches by using the hand’s surface. The idea is to use some sort of depth sensor pointing out of the side of the watch (their prototype used IR proximity sensors) to allow touchscreen-type gestures on the hand—kind of a Magic Trackpad for your watch. Various gestures could be supported:
expanding_interaction_for_smart_watches2

Whirlstools

WhirlstoolsA design exploration of adaptive architecture: stools that rotate themselves to encourage social interaction. “Every time a person newly sits on a stool, all the other unoccupied stools in its vicinity also rotate, in ways so that when another person comes along and sits on any of the remaining stools, s/he will be more likely to sit face-to-face (and consequently more likely to have spontaneous conversations) with people already seated…“.

Yuichiro Takeuchi and Jean You. Whirlstools: kinetic furniture with adaptive affordance. In CHI ’14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

Project page