I attended CHI 2014 in Toronto and had a great time. Here, in no particular order, are some of the fun things I saw at the “Interactivity” exhibits. These exhibits let you try out demos of various systems in person, and was lots of fun!

Comp*pass

This was probably my favorite thing at the conference! It’s a drawing compass that dynamically opens and closes, allowing you to draw any radial shape—including squares.

Ken Nakagaki and Yasuaki Kakehi. Comp*Pass: a compass-based drawing interface. In CHI ’14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

Project page

GaussBricks


A fun system that uses a high-density grid of Hall-effect sensors underneath an iPad to track in realtime the motion of magnetic building blocks above the surface. It allows a playful, hybrid physical-virtual experience.

Rong-Hao Liang, Liwei Chan, Hung-Yu Tseng, Han-Chih Kuo, Da-Yuan Huang, De-Nian Yang and Bing-Yu Chen. GaussBricks: magnetic building blocks for constructive tangible interactions on portable displays. In CHI’14: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

Project page

Wrigglo

A wacky interface for emotional communication between friends. Two flexible antennae protrude from the top of the phone and actuate to reflect the emotion of another person. They use spring-form shape memory wire to actuate the antennae.

Joohee Park, Young-Woo Park and Tek-Jin Nam. Wrigglo: shape-changing peripheral for interpersonal mobile communication. In CHI’14: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

 Project page

Muzlog

A highly-augmented guitar with capacitive neck stickers, pickups, and a ring that automatically transcribes what’s being played.

Han-Jong Kim and Tek-Jin Nam. Muzlog: instant music transcribing system for acoustic guitarists. In CHI ’14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

 Tactonic Touch 2.0

A grid of force-sensitive resistors to do multi-touch and -pressure sensing, with mechanical force distribution for higher resolution with fewer sensors.

Alex M Grau, Charles Hendee, John-Ross Rizzo and Ken Perlin. Mechanical force redistribution. In CHI’14: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

Product page

 Maker Vis

Physically visualizing data with personal fabrication technology. 3d print or laser cut an actual, physical bar chart.

Saiganesh Swaminathan, Conglei Shi, Yvonne Jansen, Pierre Dragicevic, Lora A Oehlberg and Jean-Daniel Fekete. Supporting the design and fabrication of physical visualizations. In CHI’14: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

Project page

InGrid: Interactive Grid Table

A table made of multiple replaceable squares. Augmented with electronics, a server knows where each tile is, allowing the user to share content between tablets attached to tiles by swiping.

Mounia Ziat, Josh Fridstrom, Kurt Kilpela, Jonathan Fancher and James J Clark. Ingrid: interactive grid table. In CHI ’14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

Project page

Game of Tones

A piano learning interface using projected graphics to help you know what to play next. Although the video shows simple bars, the CHI Interactivity version was more like Space Invaders, with the next notes falling from the top of the screen.

Linsey Raymaekers, Jo Vermeulen, Kris Luyten and Karin Coninx. Game of tones: learning to play songs on a piano using projected instructions and games. In CHI ’14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

Project page

HamsaTouch

An electro-tactile display: a 32×16 grid of phototransistors one one side is mapped to a 32×16 grid of electrodes on the other side. You put your palm on the electrodes, and detected light on the other side is turned into tiny, tickly electric shocks! Paired with a mobile phone running an edge detection algorithm, you can “see” edges by feeling with your hand. Fun to try!

Hiroyuki Kajimoto, Masaki Suzuki and Yonezo Kanno. HamsaTouch. In CHI ’14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014.

 Research lab page